Lamentation

Lamentation

Art produced for convent environments was judged for its devotional efficacy, not for the creator’s originality. The function of art in this context was to support meditation by producing an appropriate state of mind in the viewer, and to induce emotional empathy. Images of saints or deities did their work best if shown, not performing a momentary or distracting action, but as serene, enduring essences. Monastic patrons, consequently, preferred their saints in static poses, not as actors in heroic narratives. Nuns had neither access to nor interest in such vanguard artistic concerns as linear perspective, humanist rhetoric, or academic art theory. Their taste was conservative by the standards of the “progressive.”

~Mary D. Garrard, “Repositioning Plautilla Nelli’s Lamentation,” Essay, in Conversations: An Online Journal of the Initiative for the Study of Material and Visual Cultures of Religion (2014)

About papa_rod

Systems Engineer Married Daughter and grandkids Voracious Reader.Love all kinds of music. Nature nut, lover of God, hiker when I am not crippled.
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